Sunday 3rd March 15:42   (CET)
PROVISIONAL - subject to change

Lecture Programme: 2024-25 season

Nov 19
John Julius Reel
Feb 11
Christopher Aslan Alexander
Mar 25
Helen Sijsling
Apr 15
Alejandra Carazo
Unless otherwise stated, all lectures start at 6pm (Spanish time) and are ...
• in the Cultural Centre, calle Granada, Nerja and also
• available on the internet using Zoom
• available on 'catchup' for a limited period starting the day after the lecture.
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October 15th 2024 (18:00 CEST )
Emperor QianLong 1736-1796: Son of Heaven, Man Of The World
David Rosier
The Qianlong Emperor in court dress
1736 Giuseppe Castiglione
Qianlong was one of the greatest of all the Chinese Emperors. He guided China through a period of unquestionable political, economic and cultural prosperity. His achievements rivalled, if not surpassed, previous periods of exceptional Imperial achievement.
The Qianlong Emperor in Ceremonial Armour on Horseback
1758 Giuseppe Castiglione
Territorially, Qianlong added more than 30 per cent of landmass to the Empire through successful military campaigns and astute diplomacy. He was passionate about preserving his Manchu culture whilst respecting and nurturing other ethnic Chinese cultures. The Emperor travelled his Empire regularly undertaking lavish expeditions to the South and West designed to forge loyalty to his Imperial rule. Despite all these successes as a ruler it is in the fields of art and culture that Qianlong made the greatest contribution to China’s heritage. Qianlong was a noted scholar who during his lifetime wrote and published over 43,000 poems, painted on virtually a daily basis and was accomplished in the art of calligraphy. It was as a patron, collector, and curator, of Fine Art and Antiques that Qianlong created his greatest legacy. He amassed a vast treasure trove of works of art from previous dynasties or which represented the finest contemporary workmanship. His collection spanned all genres of the established arts. This lecture will provide an insight into Qianlong, not only as a highly successful Emperor of China, but also as a scholar and ‘ultimate’ collector and curator of fine art.  
About David Rosier
David Rosier is a Chartered Insurer, and Fellow of the Assurance Medical Society, by profession with a specialization in medical risk assessment. He has spent in excess of 25 years focusing on business in Asia, and China in particular, and for 14 years he and his family lived in Hong Kong. During the years in Hong Kong David, and his wife Wendy, created a ‘World Class’ collection of in excess of 500 Imperial Qing Dynasty, and related items, of costume and dress accessories. This collection was acquired, in its entirety, in late 2019 by The Shanghai Museum, People's Republic of China. David is a past committee member of the Hong Kong Textile Society. Since returning to the UK David has lectured extensively on Chinese Court Costume of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) plus the history, culture, and arts of Imperial China. Groups visited have been as diverse as The National Trust, Textile Guilds, Confucius Institutes, Art Fund and Oriental focused societies, plus university departments and museums. David is an Accredited Lecturer for The Arts Society and lectures regularly around the UK and Europe plus tours of societies in Australia, New Zealand, and SE Asia. Additionally, he has organised and led tours to China that focus on Imperial History, Art, and Culture. David is also a regular contributor for publications such as China Eye, Oriental Art, and several textile related publications.
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre
• on the internet using Zoom
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November 12th 2024 (18:00 CET )
Gleaming Spires of London- An Armchair Tour of London's Finest Buildings
Ian Swankie
The Gherkin
Bishopsgate
London boasts an extraordinary range of architecture and this talk reveals the evolution of the capital through its great buildings. We start with a brief look at the development of architecture in the capital and then focus on the modern. Whether we like it or not, there are currently well over 500 new buildings planned in London over twenty storeys high, including dozens more than twice this height. This is in addition to those already completed. This talk looks at the best of these buildings including the cutting-edge designs of the latest towers such as the Shard, the Walkie-Talkie, the Cheesegrater and the Scalpel. We discover their extraordinary architectural and engineering challenges but also examine the controversies and difficult social decisions needed to manage this dramatically changing skyline.
About Ian Swankie
Ian Swankie is a Londoner with a passion for art and architecture. He is an official guide at Tate Modern, Tate Britain, Guildhall Art Gallery and St Paul’s Cathedral, and gives tours at each venue. He is also a qualified and active freelance London guide and leads regular tours for various corporations and organisations. Since 2012 he has led a popular weekly independent art lecture group in his hometown of Richmond in West London, and he gives talks on a variety of subjects. He is an accredited lecturer for The Arts Society, and a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Art Scholars, one of the City Livery Companies. Ian talked to us in May 2022 about Grayson Perry.
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre, Nerja
• on the internet using Zoom
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November 19th 2024 (12:00 CET ) morning lecture 
My Half Orange
John Julius Reel

About John Julius Reel
 

How to watch

• in person in the Museum, Nerja (NB not available on the internet)
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November 26th 2024 (18:00 CET )
The Phoenicians on the Costa del Sol The Dawn of a New World
Manuel Parodí

About Manuel Parodí
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre, Nerja
• on the internet using Zoom
• on our YouTube channel for a limited period starting the day after the lecture.
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December 10th 2024 (18:00 CET )
Snow and ice: Holland frozen in time
Jane Choy
Winter Landscape with Ice Skaters
1608 Hendrick Averkamp
Ice Scene near a Wooden Observation Tower
1646 Jan van Goyen
The Windmill at Wijk bij Duurstede
1670 Ruisdael
Landscape with a Farmstead
1650 Rembrandt
Whereas nowadays Dutch winters tend to be rather mild, in the 17th century there were lengthy periods of frost. Unfortunately old-fashioned Dutch winters with severe frosts, thick layers of snow and frozen lakes and canals with everyone skating have become rare. But these Dutch winters of bygone times were captured in paintings by the great masters of the Dutch Golden Age. In the comfort of a warm interior I would like to show you how this typically Dutch genre developed and talk about some of the famous works by artists such as Hendrick Avercamp, who specialised in winter landscapes, but also Jacob van Ruisdael, Jan van Goyen and even Rembrandt who showed the traditional Dutch landscape at its coldest.
About Jane Choy
Jane E. Choy-Thurlow is a docent and enjoys giving lectures and tours at the Mauritshuis, Prince William V gallery and Huygens Museum Hofwijck in The Hague, The Netherlands. A few of the many exhibits in the Mauritshuis she has been part of are: the legendary Johannes Vermeer exhibit, Rembrandt by Himself and Holbein, Portraitist of the Renaissance. An active member of The Arts Society, she is a founding member of DFAS of The Hague and has fulfilled committee positions including chairman and Mainland Europe Area Chairman, Area Trainer and New Societies/Support committee member. She received her BSc from Salem State University, USA, her MEd from Trinity College Dublin and continued art history studies at Leiden University. In 2018 she was given the honour of Knight in the Order of Oranje Nassau by the Dutch King Willem Alexander of Orange for her knowledge and work in the field of the Arts especially 15th to 17th century Dutch and Flemish art.
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre
• on the internet using Zoom
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January 14th 2025 (18:00 CET )
Arte Nova and Art Deco in Porto and Aveiro, Portugal
Anne Anderson PhD BA FSA
The Casa Mário Pessoa
São Bento
Villa Serralves
Like many countries enjoying great prosperity at the end of the 19th century, Portuguese architects and designers developed their own variant of Art Nouveau, known locally as Arte Nova. These buildings are often distinguished by their Azulejos or hand painted tile panels. Azulejos are found on the interior and exterior of every type of building from churches to railway stations, the most notably example being the 20,000 or so azulejo tiles used to decorate the vestibule of Porto’s São Bento railway station, built in 1905-16 by the architect Marques da Silva. Tiles were also used extensively in Aveiro, where most of the Arte Nova buildings are built in adobe (sun-dried clay bricks). The Casa Mário Pessoa (1906-09), the most striking building in Averio, is attributed to Francisco Augusto da Silva Rocha, who headed the local Arte Nova school. Built for the entrepreneur Mário Belmonte Pessoa, the residence is a riot of colour as well as tiles. Returning to Porto our virtual tour ends with the Villa Serralves, the finest Art Deco residence in Portugal. Affectionately known as the ‘Pink House’, this ‘Streamline Modern’ villa reflects the sophisticated taste of its owner, Carlos Alberto Cabral, 2nd Count of Vizela. Visiting the 1925 International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts held in Paris, Cabral became acquainted with the leading architects and designers of the day. His personal vision was realised by architect Charles Siclis, interior designer Émile–Jacques Ruhlmann, and landscape architect Jacques Gréber. The stunning gardens are a perfect place to relax at the end of the day.
About Anne Anderson
From 1993-2007 Anne was a senior lecturer on the Fine Arts Valuation degree courses at Southampton Solent University, where she specialized in the Aesthetic Movement, Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau and Modernism. She has published books on the Pre-Raphaelites, Edward Burne-Jones, and Art Nouveau Architecture. Her academic papers have appeared in many well-respected journals including Design History; The British Art Journal; and Victorian Literature and Culture. Anne has also curated four national exhibitions, mostly recently Beyond the Brotherhood The Pre-Raphaelite Legacy (2019-20). American fellowships held include the Huntington Library, CA and the American Antiquarian Society, MA. Anne’s career as an international speaker has taken her all over the world from Australia to Canada. She has also lectured on several cruise ships, Swan Hellenic’s Minerva, the Spirit of Adventure and the Hebridean. Anne talked to us about Ikea in January 2019.
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre
• on the internet using Zoom
• on our YouTube channel for a limited period starting the day after the lecture.
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January 28th 2025 (18:00 CET )
Hunting the Borderlands in Ronda
Rafa Anderson BA(hons) Arch, Dip Arch, RIBA
Ronda is an intricate jewel in Andalusia, dense with beauty and symbolism. Its character has largely been defined by the role it played on the borderlands of the Nazrid kingdom, that diaphanous frontier continually in flux, expanding and contracting over centuries in the delicate negotiation between Christian and Muslim states. This citadel in the sky, protected by the rugged Serrania, has become a land of fable on both sides, and we will weave our story across these borderlands to discover the treasures within.
About Rafa Anderson
Rafael spent his earlier architectural career working in London, Scandinavia, India and Hong Kong. 12 years ago he came to Southern Spain where he has practiced primarily in La Alpujarra and Granada, recently completing the restoration of a listed early 16th Century Islamic house in the Albayzin. He has a particular interest in Spanish history and architecture and has lectured widely on related subjects. Rafa is no stranger to Nerja, having to talked to us on a range of subjects over the years.
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre, Nerja
• on the internet using Zoom
• on our YouTube channel for a limited period starting the day after the lecture.
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February 11th 2025 (18:00 CET )
Unravelling the Silk Road
Christopher Aslan Alexander
Wool, cotton and silk have each played a crucial role in the fortunes of Central Asia. Wool created the clothing and housing needed by the great nomadic cultures that were to dominate Middle Asia. Silk was more valuable than gold and used as currency, creating a network of trading routes that led to the first outbreak of globalisation. Cotton was the cause of Russian and then Soviet Colonisation and continues to cause controversy today as well as human misery and environmental catastrophe The felts, carpets, embroideries, robes and veils of the Silk Road stratified wealth, displayed religious and political entrenchments and changed the fortunes of this fascinating part of the world; a meeting place between Mohammed and Marx.
About Christopher Aslan Alexander
Chris Aslan was born in Turkey (hence the name Aslan) and spent his childhood there and in war-torn Beirut. After school, Chris spent two years at sea before studying Media and journalism at Leicester University. He then moved to Khiva, a desert oasis in Uzbekistan, establishing a UNESCO workshop reviving fifteenth century carpet designs and embroideries, and becoming the largest non-government employer in town. He was kicked out as part of an anti-Western purge, and took a year in Cambridge to write A Carpet Ride to Khiva. Chris then spent several years in the Pamirs mountains of Tajikistan, training yak herders to comb their yaks for their cashmere-like down. Next came a couple more years in Kyrgyzstan living in the world’s largest natural walnut forest and establishing a wood-carving workshop. Since then, Chris has studied and rowed at Oxford, and is now based in Cambridge, but with plans to move to North Cyprus. When he’s not lecturing for The Arts Society, he writes. His latest book, Unravelling the Silk Road, is published by Icon Books. Chris also takes tours to Central Asia, returning whenever he can, having left a large chunk of his heart out there.
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre
• on the internet using Zoom
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March 11th 2025 (18:00 CET )
The Borgias, the most infamous family in history?
Sarah Dunant
Pope Alexander VI
Pinturicchio
Cesare Borgia
Murder, poison, corruption and incest: all perfect ingredients for sensational popular culture. But in an age known for its brutality and church corruption were the Borgias really so bad? This sumptuous illustrated lecture reveals the real story of the family that dominated the Papacy and Italian politics during the last decade of the 15th century: the wily, charismatic, womaniser, Pope Alexander, his sociopathic son, Cesare, cardinal, general and the model for “The Prince” by Machiavelli, himself a character in their story, and his adored daughter, Lucrezia
Lucrezia Borgia
who moves from “the greatest whore in Rome” to a devout and treasured duchess of the city of Ferrara. Sometimes truth is more intoxicating than myth.
About Sarah Dunant
Novelist, broadcaster and critic. Sarah read history at Cambridge, then worked for many years as a cultural journalist in radio and television on such programmes as Kaleidoscope (BBC Radio 4), The Late Show (BBC 2), and Night Waves/Free thinking (BBC Radio 3). She has published thirteen novels, taught renaissance studies at Washington University, St Louis and lectured around the world at festivals and conferences. Her last five novels have been set within the Italian Renaissance. In the Name of the Family completes the story of the Borgia family and the remarkable period of Italian history in which they lived. She is a regular contributor to BBC Radio 4’s A POINT OF VIEW and these talks, alongside her series on history for Radio 4, When Greeks Flew Kites are available on podcast or BBC sounds.
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre
• on the internet using Zoom
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March 25th 2025 (18:00 CET )
Famous Freemason Artists
Helen Sijsling

About Helen Sijsling
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre, Nerja
• on the internet using Zoom
• on our YouTube channel for a limited period starting the day after the lecture.
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April 15th 2025 (18:00 CEST )
Women Artists in Art History
Alejandra Carazo

About Alejandra Carazo
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre, Nerja
• on the internet using Zoom
• on our YouTube channel for a limited period starting the day after the lecture.
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May 13th 2025 (18:00 CEST )
‘All the Lonely People’: The work of American Realist Edward Hopper
Stella Lyons MA BA
Braids, 1979
(Helga Testorf)
Christina's World
1948
‘If there is such a thing as a purely American tradition in Art, it is represented at its best in the straightforward canvases of Andrew Wyeth.’ — LIFE magazine, 1948. Andrew Wyeth is one of America’s best-known Realist painters of the 20th century. In a career spanning 75 years, he created paintings of everyday life in Pennsylvania and Maine that were imbued with mystery and emotion. He painted with an exacting detail that led to his style being termed ‘magic realism’. This talk looks at his poignant landscapes, his scandalous ‘Helga’ series and his moving portraits, including a focused look at his most iconic work, ‘Christina’s World’.
About Stella Lyons
‘Without sacrificing scholarship, Stella Lyons has a most engaging way of hooking an audience into sharing her passionate interest in art history, drawing three dimensional human stories and experiences from the two-dimensional canvas’ – Maev Kennedy, writer and Arts correspondent for The Guardian Stella Grace Lyons is a freelance Art History lecturer, speaker and writer accredited with The Arts Society. She has lectured across the UK, Ireland, Spain, Norway, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Malaysia and will soon embark on a lecturing tour in Australasia. Stella gained her BA in the History of Art with a 1st class in her dissertation from the University of Bristol (2007-2011), and her MA in History of Art from the University of Warwick. She spent a year studying Renaissance art in Italy at the British Institute of Florence, and three months studying Venetian art in Venice. In addition, she attended drawing classes at the prestigious Charles H. Cecil studios in Florence, a private atelier that follows a curriculum based on the leading ateliers of nineteenth century Paris. Stella runs her own Art History lectures both in person and online. She is a regular lecturer in the UK and Europe for The Arts Society, Tour companies, and the National Trust, amongst others. Stella is also a part-time lecturer for the University of South Wales. She has written about art for several publications and her article on Norwegian art was recently featured on the front cover of The Arts Society magazine. In addition to her lecturing work, Stella works as an artist’s model for the internationally renowned figurative artist, Harry Holland. Stella talked to us about Sorolla in September 2021.
 

How to watch

• in person in the Cultural Centre
• on the internet using Zoom
• on our YouTube channel for a limited period starting the day after the lecture.